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Why can’t people build stadiums in Italy? (Part 2)

But the project exceeded its budget by 84%, with the team cost estimated to be one billion euros today. The overspending left a huge debt and so the local government that owned the stadium demanded exorbitant rent from the clubs.

They were even more ugly when CONI (Italian Olympic Committee) financed a number of projects with the requirement of adding an athletic track to make football fans pushed further, difficult to follow. ball situations on the field.

But the most unfortunate part of the 1990 project lies in its timing. Nowadays, the renovated / newly built stadiums are no different from modern architecture, from a distance looks like a spaceship; at that time, the stadiums in Italy were faithful to the giant concrete ‘rice bowl’ design.
The real stadium-building boom took place in the late 1990s, with iconic constructions like the Stade de France or the Amsterdam Arena. Thus, although built only less than a decade apart, but Italy has many backward and redundant stadiums compared to the rest of Europe. Many pitches are too big for the club’s stature, like San Nicola with 58,000 seats while Bari, currently competing in Serie C, has an average audience of just 12,000. The average number of spectators watching Lazio and AS Roma is 40,000 but that is still too small, leaving more than 33,000 vacancies at the giant Olimpico. On the other hand, clubs have struggled to find round-by-round revenue, while still paying extremely expensive maintenance fees to ensure these dilapidated stadiums meet the standards of tournament organizers.